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Products

  • Lyretail Hogfish (Bodianus anthioides) 

    The Lyretail Hogfish is one of the hardiest and most docile of all the large hogfish.  Make no mistake, as this guy gets larger it cannot be housed with invertabrates as it will eat everything that fits in its mouth.

    The best foods for hogfish are a good carnivore pellet along with frozen chopped krill, squid, clams and mussels. 

  • Spanish Hogfish (Bodianus rufus)

    While the Spanish Hogfish is young it can be kept in a reef type tank however it will soon need to be banished to a fish only or FOWLR system.  This fish will get very aggressive so make sure it is not housed with timid fish.  It will eventually eat anything it can get in its mouth.  Now, this fish is easy to keep and very beautiful.

    Feed any good carnivore type dry food and hogfish will generally take any frozen food as well.

  • Sea Grass Wrasse (Novaculichthys macrolepidotus) 

    Also Known As:

    Emerald Wrasse
    Green Dragon Wrasse


    The Sea Grass Wrasse is known foreating flat worms, pyramid snails, montipora eating nudibranches. They are relatively peaceful and like a sandy bottom to bury themselves.  It is not uncommon for larger specimens to harrass smaller tankmates and eat small crabs and shrimp.

    Always have a cover on a tank that houses wrasses as they can jump out of uncovered aquariums.

    These wrasses require meaty frozen foods such as brine and mysis as well as high quality dry foods.


  • Naso Tang (Naso lituratus)

    Also Known As:

    Lipstick Tang
    Orangespine Unicornfish

    Naso Tangs are very popular aquarium fish due to their bright coloring and presence in most aquaria.  This fish should be kept in at least 125 gallon aquariums and should be a fish added toward the end of stocking the aquarium as they can be quite bold and territorial with new fish.  It does best in a tank full of liverock where it can pick at any green algae.

    All tangs should be kept in a well established aquarium where the parameters don't change much.  This fish is a bit more hardy than many of the other tangs.

    Like all tangs, this fish should get plenty of algae and dry foods with kelp in addition to frozen mysis, plankton or brine shrimp.

  • Raccoon Butterflyfish (Chaetodon lunula) 

    The peaceful Raccoon Butterfly not only has the mask of a raccoon but also feeds at night in nature.  As it becomes accustom to aquarium life it tends to eat during the day.  This fish not only picks at corals but also eats anemones including both aiptasia and majano.  If it is having trouble in a FOWLR tank find someone with a small anemone they want to get rid of as this fish will have a hard time passing them up.  If housing the Raccoon Butterflyfish with other butterflyfish put them in the aquarium all at the same time for best results.

    This is a great example of the beauty of a marine butterfly.  Unfortunately butterflyfish are better suited for Fish Only with Live Rock (FOWLR) tanks and not reef aquariums.

    Food variety is the key with all butterflyfish so use many frozen foods in the rotation!  Mysis, brine shrimp and plankton should all be staples with a butterflyfish specific&nb

  • Pearlscale Butterflyfish (Chaetodon xanthrusus) 

    The peaceful Pearlscale Butterfly or Yellowtail Butterfly is a favorite among hobbyists.  It is one of few fish with a true crosshatch pattern on its sides.  There are many look-alike species of butterflyfish.

    This is a great example of the beauty of a marine butterfly.  Unfortunately butterflyfish are better suited for Fish Only with Live Rock (FOWLR) tanks and not reef aquariumsThis fish can be kept with other peaceful fish including other butterflyfish as long as they are added at the same time.

    Food variety is the key with all butterflyfish so use many frozen foods in the rotation!  Mysis, brine shrimp and plankton should all be staples with a butterflyfish specific frozen food being added if available.  A green based dry food should also be fed regularly with butterflyfish.

  • Klein's Butterfly (Chaetodon kleinii) 

    Klein's Buttflyfish is also known as Blacklip Butterflyfish, Orange Butterflyfish, Brown Butterflyfish and Sunburst Butterflyfish.  This is quite possibly the easiest of all butterflyfish to keep in the home aquarium.  Despite the fact it may eat soft corals it is generally very peaceful with all fish including other butterflyfish including other Klein's as long as all were introduced at the same time.

    Food variety is the key with all butterflyfish so use many frozen foods in the rotation!

  • Black & White Heniochus (Heniochus acuminatus) 

    The fish with many names, Heni, Heniochus, Bannerfish, and Poor Man's Moorish Idol are the most common.  This is generally a peaceful fish that will get some size.  It will tend to pick at stony coral polyps but some hobbyists have been able to work them into reef tanks.  This is a candidate for schooling providing the housing is very large.

    This omnivore would appreciate lots of meaty frozen foods in it's diet.  Plankton and mysis shrimp would be very appreciated.

  • Sunburst Anthias (Serranocirrhitus latus) 

    The Sunburst or Fathead Sunburst Anthias likes to swim in the darker spots of the aquarium.  Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the group will likely develop into a male to take his place, the opposite of clownfish where the male develops into the female.

    Anthias should be kept in high female to male ratios for best results.  Although this fish can be aggressive with other anthias it is very seldom a problem with other tankmates.

    Due to this fish having a high metabolism it is likely that you will need to feed the fish up to four times daily.  These fish require very small food and may take a while getting them from zooplankton to small dry foods.  Once on dry foods, a aquarium fish feeder may aid in feeding

  • Passer Angelfish (Holacanthus passer)

    Like most of the other large angelfish this fish will eat corals and not play nice with other similar angelfish unless housed in a very large tank, 220 or better.  This fish is sometimes called the King Angelfish.  It does adapt well to aquarium life.

    This Angelfish requires a diet of Spirulina, marine algae, mysis or frozen shrimp and other meaty foods and high-quality angelfish preparations that contain sponge.

  • Queen Angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris) 

    This striking gets BIG.  AN 18" fish requires a BIG aquarium, 180 gallons or better.  When you see a large live speciman it is not a fish you will soon forget.  It does eat corals and canbe quarrelsome with other angelfish.

    This Angelfish requires a diet of Spirulina, marine algae, mysis or frozen shrimp and other meaty foods and high-quality angelfish preparations that contain sponge.

  • Majestic Angelfish (Pomacanthus navarchus)

    This fish is also known as the Blue Girdled Angelfish and the Navarchus Angelfish.  It is a very popular angelfish due to its striking coloration and ease of adaptation to the home aquarium.  While it does eat some corals and clams it typically does not bother SPS corals.  Caution must be exercized with other large angelfish as it can be quite quarrelsome with the wrong tankmates.

    This Angelfish requires a diet of Spirulina, marine algae, mysis or frozen shrimp and other meaty foods and high-quality angelfish preparations that contain sponge.

  • Black Velvet Angelfish (Chaetodontoplus melanosoma)

    This fish is also known as the Gray Poma ANgelfish.  Although it is not a great candidate to be housed with other medium to large angelfish, it is relatively peaceful with other aquarium inhabitants.  This should be kept in a FOWLR tank where it can graze on algae.

    The Black Velvet Angelfish requires a diet of Spirulina, marine algae, high-quality angelfish preparations that include sponge, and mysis or frozen shrimp and other meaty foods.

     

  • Bluespotted Angelfish (Chaetontoplus caeruleopunctatus)

    This is a seldom seen species in the hobyy.  It reaches eight inches in length and feeds on sponges and tunicates in the wild.  It is a good candidate for a FOWLR aquarium.

    The Bluespotted Angelfish requires a diet of Spirulina, marine algae, high-quality angelfish preparations, and mysis or frozen shrimp and other meaty foods.

  • Multicolor Angelfish (Centropyge multicolor)

    The Multicolor Angefish tends to be a little more rare in the hobby than some of the other dwarf angelfishes.  It also tends to be a little more shy.  The best option for reef tanks with this fish is a mushroom and polyp tank as it will nip other soft and stony types of corals.  FOWLR tanks would still be the best type of tank for this beautiful fish.

    The Multicolor Angelfish requires a diet of Spirulina, marine algae, high-quality angelfish preparations, and mysis or frozen shrimp and other meaty foods.

  • Red Stripe Angelfish (Centropyge eibli)

    A minimum of a 40 gallon tank with lots of hiding places and live rock for grazing will offer an environment in which to thrive. The Red Stripe or Eibli Angelfish is a very popular fish for hobbyists who are keeping Fish Only systems.  This beautiful fish will normally pick at stony and soft corals as well as clams. 

    The Red Stripe Angelfish requires a diet of Spirulina, marine algae, high-quality angelfish preparations, and mysis or frozen shrimp.

  • Bicolor Angelfish (Centropyge bicolor)

    The Bicolor Angelfish is a very popular fish for hobbyists who are keeping Fish Only systems.  This beautiful fish will normally pick at stony and soft corals as well as clams.  This fish does best on marine algae diets along with specific angel formulas, and frozen mysis.  An aquarium full of liverock suits this fish best as it can pick at the rock for food and dart in and out of the rocky crevices.